1. prettybooks:

(by b.new.man.)
  2. wemightdietomorrow:

there are the ones we miss; and there are the ones we lost.

Always reblog railroad tracks.  Always.

    wemightdietomorrow:

    there are the ones we miss; and there are the ones we lost.

    Always reblog railroad tracks.  Always.

  3. Post with 6 notes
    Posted 1 day ago
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    Writing

    I love that ache between my shoulder blades that tells me I’ve been writing at the computer for a long time.  I love that slightly dizzy, disconnected from reality feeling I get when I finally take a break and my head’s still in my novel.  And there’s nothing quite like the exhilarating tension of feeling the characters nearing the end of their story and all the while the deadline looms.  I go to bed after writing all day, knowing I’ll be up in a few hours to write all day again, smiling with the satisfaction that comes with the knowledge that this is exactly what I always wanted to do.

  4. Quote with 2 notes
    Posted 1 day ago
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    Words move, music moves
    Only in time; but that which is only living
    Can only die. Words, after speech, reach
    Into the silence. Only by the form, the pattern,
    Can words or music reach
    The stillness, as a Chinese jar still
    Moves perpetually in its stillness.
    Not the stillness of the violin, while the note lasts,
    Not that only, but the co-existence,
    Or say that the end precedes the beginning,
    And the end and the beginning were always there
    Before the beginning and after the end.
    And all is always now. Words strain,
    Crack and sometimes break, under the burden,
    Under the tension, slip, slide, perish,
    Will not stay still.
    T. S. Eliot, from “Burnt Norton,” in Four Quartets (via chavelaque)
  5. Quote with 4 notes
    Posted 1 day ago
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    So here I am, in the middle way, having had twenty years—
    Twenty years largely wasted, the years of l’entre deux guerres—
    Trying to use words, and every attempt
    Is a wholly new start, and a different kind of failure
    Because one has only learnt to get the better of words
    For the thing one no longer has to say, or the way in which
    One is no longer disposed to say it. And so each venture
    Is a new beginning, a raid on the inarticulate,
    With shabby equipment always deteriorating
    In the general mess of imprecision of feeling,
    Undisciplined squads of emotion. And what there is to conquer
    By strength and submission, has already been discovered
    Once or twice, or several times, by men whom one cannot hope
    To emulate — but there is no competition—
    There is only the fight to recover what has been lost
    And found and lost again and again: and now, under conditions
    That seem unpropitious. But perhaps neither gain nor loss.
    For us, there is only the trying. The rest is not our business.
    T. S. Eliot, from “East Coker,” in Four Quartets (via chavelaque)
  6. Always reblog rolling ladders.

    Always reblog rolling ladders.

  7. littledallilasbookshelf:

a cozy reading nook.

    littledallilasbookshelf:

    a cozy reading nook.

  8. Photo with 21,796 notes
    Posted 1 day ago
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    mimswriter:

Kurt Vonnegut: 16 Rules For Writing Fiction
1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.
2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.
3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.
4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.
5. Start as close to the end as possible.
6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.
7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.
8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.
9. Find a subject you care aboutand which you in your heart feel others should care about.
10. Do not ramble.
11. Keep it simple. Simplicity of language is not only reputable, but perhaps even sacred.
12. Have guts to cut. Your rule might be this: If a sentence, no matter how excellent, does not illuminate your subject in some new and useful way, scratch it out.
13. Sound like yourself. The writing style which is most natural for you is bound to echo the speech you heard when a child.
14. Say what you mean. You should avoid Picasso-style or jazz-style writing, if you have something worth saying and wish to be understood.
15. Pity the readers. Our stylistic options as writers are neither numerous nor glamorous, since our readers are bound to be such imperfect artists.
16. You choose. The most meaningful aspect of our styles, which is what we choose to write about, is utterly unlimited.

    mimswriter:

    Kurt Vonnegut: 16 Rules For Writing Fiction

    1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.

    2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.

    3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.

    4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.

    5. Start as close to the end as possible.

    6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.

    7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.

    8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.

    9. Find a subject you care aboutand which you in your heart feel others should care about.

    10. Do not ramble.

    11. Keep it simple. Simplicity of language is not only reputable, but perhaps even sacred.

    12. Have guts to cut. Your rule might be this: If a sentence, no matter how excellent, does not illuminate your subject in some new and useful way, scratch it out.

    13. Sound like yourself. The writing style which is most natural for you is bound to echo the speech you heard when a child.

    14. Say what you mean. You should avoid Picasso-style or jazz-style writing, if you have something worth saying and wish to be understood.

    15. Pity the readers. Our stylistic options as writers are neither numerous nor glamorous, since our readers are bound to be such imperfect artists.

    16. You choose. The most meaningful aspect of our styles, which is what we choose to write about, is utterly unlimited.

  9. Photoset with 3,160 notes
    Posted 1 day ago
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    minion31396:

    crosby-juice:

    A day in the life of a female hockey fan.

    frankly, I’m not going to be insulted by some dumb fuck who doesn’t know how to spell “guarantee” 

    There’s sexism here, yeah.  But the larger problem is SPORTS! worship.  I’m a man, so I guess by the standards of these guys, I could pass as a “real hockey fan” (whatever the hell that is…)  But if I wasted my time learning the names of ten people on any SPORTS! team, I’d have to kick my own ass for being so lame.  Why does our culture have this idiotic concept of pledging allegiance to SPORTS! teams of privileged millionaires?  Why this constant one-upsmanship and “I’m a bigger SPORTS! worshipper than you” mentality?  Ladies (and gentlemen) don’t defend yourselves against the accusation that you don’t meet these idiots’ standards for SPORTS! worship, but be happy that you are not one of them.  Let go of the ridiculous artificial pressures from SPORTS! worshippers, and I “guaranty” you will be happier.

  10. Question with 4 notes
    Posted 2 days ago
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    Anonymous asked:
    can you recommend any books by authors going to the Texas Book Festival? :)

    So I’ve never heard of the Texas Book Festvall so i did a quick google search and IT LOOKS AWESOME. 

    Some good authors from the YA area include:

    Melissa De La Cruz
    Trent Reedy
    Stephanie Perkins
    Rick Yancey

    If you want to take a look at more go here!

  11. Photo with 1 note
    Posted 2 days ago
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    splarteens:

#Mssarahlikes Divided We Fall by Trent Reedy. Can America survive this? 5/5 stars! #springdalelibrary #instareview

    splarteens:

    #Mssarahlikes Divided We Fall by Trent Reedy. Can America survive this? 5/5 stars! #springdalelibrary #instareview

  12. Photo with 1,256 notes
    Posted 2 days ago
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  13. tilly-and-her-books:

I’ll collect books from all around the world. 

    tilly-and-her-books:

    I’ll collect books from all around the world

  14. Photoset with 336 notes
    Posted 3 days ago
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    abandonedmarionette:

    September Book Photo Challenge

    Day 9 : Favorite Cover

    So as you can see, I cannot choose just one. I got six books here from my collection that I think have the most gorgeous cover. They are so beautiful and I love looking at them.

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